IMDB Top 250 Review: #179: Twelve Monkeys (1995)

12Mon

For more reviews in my IMDB Top 250 series, click here.

What do I think of when people say the name Terry Gilliam? A man who is so full of good ideas, perhaps too many, that when revealed to others his imagination simply clogs his creations. Terry Gilliam  (Brazil, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas) is an ex-pythoneer who has a knack for flights of fancy, or anything bizarre, surreal, insane, or deranged. 12 Monkeys (1995) is probably his most well known film, and his main one accountable for his financial success in directing. Typically his films haven’t done financially well at the box office, and usually go on to become cult hits. I didn’t know what to expect from 12 Monkeys, but i rarely do when it’s a Gilliam film. I’m still fairly undecided if I loved it, or hated it. 

James Cole (Bruce Willis) is a convict living in a dystopian world where society now lives underground, due to a mass viral outbreak that killed roughly 5 billion of the population, leaving a small 1 percent behind. James is a convict guilty of several counts of violence, and ill-behavior. As penance, a ruling board of 5 scientists send James back to the past in order to find out more about this outbreak. They send him to 1990, instead of 1996 as chaos ensues, and he is arrested for gibbering about the future which police officers interpret as madness. He is locked away for his insanity, as psychologist Kathryn Railly (Madeleine Stowe) begins to feel sympathy for him.  James almost turns insane himself numbed by the intensity and quantity of drugs administered. He escapes the confines of the institution from the help of completely insane conspiracy nut Jeffrey Goins (Brad Pitt). James kidnaps the good doctor Railly, and takes her on a journey in order to alter the future he comes from.

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The ruling board of scientists.

The synopsis may seem messy, but it’s a very ‘busy’ film as you’d expect from Gilliam. Essentially it’s an apocalyptic future science-fiction drama, with elements of romance. James’ psyche is stretched between two worlds and we see his mind deteriorate as he attempts to identify what’s real and what isn’t, although seemingly all of it is. Conflicted by Railly’s words, and that of the scientists the whole thing is incredibly surreal. The goal to stop this ‘army of the twelve monkeys’ is a wild goose chase, and is based around the idea of the recollection of false memories, and how we our self alter our memories to the most logical or likely solution, though it can fool us. The state of dream is thought of in this way too. James has a recurring dream, which would turn out to be the closing moments of the film which he sees as a child (due to time travel) which he recollects differently each time. 

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While entertaining, and certainly original, Twelve Monkeys left me wanting. There’s just a bit too much going on, if it were more streamlined and the script were more solid I would have enjoyed it a lot more. Admittedly the performances went a long way in holding it together, particularly that of Willis, and Pitt. It’s an odd concoction of a film, artistic in it’s ideas and views, yet it plays out like an action film, with strong hints of romance? You could literally repackage the film again and again, in entirely different ways. For example: A psychologist falls in love with her patient who thinks he’s from the future, who sees himself die, only to dream about seeing himself die, incorrectly. Brad Pitt plays a maniac, while Bruce Willis thinks Brad Pitt will cause an apocalyptic plague, when in reality he just raids the zoo.

Bizarre, quirky and distinctly original. However original though, at points I found it rather tedious. I’d be surprised if this is exactly what Gilliam wanted it to be. Some elements certainly seem shoehorned in. I didn’t love Twelve Monkeys. But I was intrigued by it. At 179, it holds a solid, firm ranking. I’m tempted to say it deserves it’s place simply because there are films on the list that don’t bring anything new to the table, while this does. For now, I’ll stick with debatable.

Judgment – Debatable

Top 250: #52 The Dark Knight Rises.

Bane

To see more reviews from my IMDB Top 250 series, click here.

The final installment in Christopher Nolan’s highly praised The Dark Knight trilogy comes in at #52 on the IMDB Top 250, below the Dark Knight, and far above Batman begins. I started with this primarily because I already had access to it, but also it’s such a good trilogy that splitting it up as opposed to reviewing it in succession has it’s merits. In my eyes, The Dark Knight Rises (2012) is an excellent example of how to progress a film through it’s sequels, and how to have a on-going story arch. While each entry has it’s fundamental villain and plot, overall the trilogy can be broke up into stages. Batman Begins (2005) establishes the character like you’d expect. The Dark Knight (2008) acts as the complication. While the threat of the Joker was never truly huge, the death of Rachel would haunt Bruce Wayne and leave him a weakened man. Then we arrive at Dark Knight which is the call to action in which Bruce Wayne must face his inner demons.

Eight years after the events of The Dark Knight, Bruce Wayne (Christian Bale) barely leaves his mansion and is mostly known as a hermit. The loss of Rachel means Bruce Wayne was emotionally damaged, while the peacetime Harvey Dent and his death provided left the city no longer needing Batman. Alfred (Michael Caine) grows concerned as Bruce Wayne takes to the streets once again to protect Gotham from a powerful vigilante known as Bane (Tom Hardy). A stock-market attack leaves the coffers of Wayne Industries barren, leaving it susceptible to corporate takeover which would have grave repercussions. Batman attempts to face his foe Bane, to find him he calls upon Selina Kyle (Anne Hathaway). Selina betrays him, leaving to fend for himself against Bane who easily dispatches him in combat. With his spirit and body broken, can the dark knight rise again? 

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DC and it’s characters function in a very certain way. DC’s flagship characters Batman, Superman, Green Lantern and so forth are traditionally quite dull in a very typical do-gooder sense. The main appeal is primarily the villain, and I think that’s why the Dark Knight Trilogy works so well. If you’ll notice the Dark Knight, and Rises are praised much more than Batman Begins. I think this due to the presence of potent villains who are bursting with character opposed to begins which is mainly focused on establishing Batman. The contrast is interesting when compared to Marvel and it’s films, characters that feel human and jump to life from the page, but their villains are hackneyed, cliche’ and hard to differentiate. 

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Knightfall

Seem familiar?

So let’s talk about Bane. Why Bane? Well, Bane carries a certain legacy about his character ever since the Knightfall arc in the Batman comics as he broke Batman’s back and is one of the only villains to ever be regarded as his physical superior. Fans were generally skeptical about Nolan’s huge redesigning of the character from his luchador, venom-addicted ways. Simply put, I think Nolan was trying to move away from the gimmicky nonsense of the comic books. This brutal, unflinching, highly trained and well organized disfigured man suits the ideology of Batman perfectly. The original costume, the whole venom power-origin story would have just gotten in the way. Bane was fantastic and highly entertaining, and this is obvious among fans because of the sour reaction of his demise, and I’m glad Tom Hardy left a very definitive mark on the franchise.

While I wouldn’t say the story’s inner workings are quite as well-strung as it’s predecessor, Rises is definitely the most emotive entry in the franchise. Alfred is mainly an afterthought in Batman, but Michael Caine brought so much emotion into his conflicts with Wayne in Rises.  It set the film rolling as we saw Bruce tumble in a downwards spiral into Bane’s trap until he finally found the confidence to best himself, and regain the vigor he once had. Also there was some nice, well-embedded symbolism with the concept of ‘rising’. 

The film is incredible as both a trilogy installment, and a stand-alone piece of cinema. I do think Rises deserves it’s place in the IMDB Top 250, however it’s to justify all three of them as essentially three of the best films ever made according to IMDB’s standards. Perhaps that’s going a bit far. However, Nolan is a talented auteur and i’m not really surprised to see this be the case, along with many of his other films. 

Judgment – Deserved

Until next time folks, before I rise again from a mysterious pit in the middle east, I’ll just leave this here.

IMDB Top 250 Project and Reviews 1-7.

IMDB

The Internet Movie Database, for those who live in a cave.

So, I’ve recently been looking for a project of some kind. The Greatest Director thing didn’t really pan out. Turns out it can be hard to follow one director in rapid succession, as it really dulls the pallet. Regardless, I’ll do the same, just not ‘as a series’, just out of loop. So I’d been looking for something since. Recently Tyson Carter of Headinavice.com who I’m sure many of you are already acquainted with, decided to end his IMDB Top 250 project. It’s a large, clunky, and hard to tackle project, but I’d like to give it a go. I tracked down the elusive Tyson, and he was nice enough to write a few words of perspective for this introduction, of which I’m very grateful. Here’s what the bastard had to say:

When Sam got in touch and did the polite thing of asking me if I would mind him taking over the IMDB Top 250 Project, I initially just assumed he wanted all the fame, fortune and girls that came with doing it. He assures me it’s not that, and he didn’t even want to steal the reviews I had already stolen, and simply wanted to start from scratch. Maybe he felt our work wasn’t good enough…
 
Anyway, the challenge outgrew my site, and I had to stop it. As tough as that decision was, I had to get my site back to what I wanted it to be. Since Sam has no objective or goals for his blog and is just coasting through, this project will be perfect for him and will get his lazy ass writing. So this is me, passing the proverbial torch. Please join me in wishing him all the best in reviewing 250 films, on his own. This will be a long old project and I hope he does better than me 🙂

 

As jovial as always. Yes it’s true, I’ve decided to take on this big mammoth of a project. I plan to review all 250 of the Internet Movie Database’s top rankings of user voted films. Why you ask? that’s simple. I don’t really like the IMDB ranking system. People always use it as a means to justify a film choice, or to assert it’s good. I mean sure, if something’s good by committee then most of the time there’s a defensible argument behind it. What I seek to prove by this basically is that a lot of the films here probably don’t deserve their place over different films. And obviously that’s up for debate, everything is. That’s the whole enjoyment of it, really. I may even be proven wrong (To be fair I have seen a large chunk of them in my own experience, but not recently and not the majority of them).

So, obviously this is a big project. But i’m fairly determined, and i’m relatively certain I’ll enjoy it too regardless of the commitment needed. As for how I’m handling it, I’ll generally do one as every other post, along with contemporary releases and older films as I always do. As for the rating, I always found Tyson’s system appropriate for this kind of thing, where as I don’t typically use one. So I’ve decided to judge these as follows, I’ll be using a fairly basic rating system with 3 essential judgments along with a conclusion of how I decided that. In addition I may comment on it’s ranking in the decimal system and whether I find it appropriate.

Deserving – Obviously self-explanatory, deserves its spot among the Top 250, or perhaps even higher along the ranking.

Debatable – A sound entry, but one that’s not necessarily spectacular and could be replaced by several better films, or films similar to it.

Undeserving – In no way does this film deserve to be crowned as one of the elite, nor is it notably unique.

As well as announcing the project, this’ll stand as a starting point essentially. Since the start of my blog, I’ve reviewed the following films among the Top 250:

#51: Django Unchained. (2012)

#100: Raging Bull (1980)

#143: The Sixth Sense (1999)

#141: Casino (1995)

#158: Annie Hall (1977)

#191: The Graduate (1966)

#203: Life of Pi (2012)

However, obviously they’re all missing some relevant discussion about their place in the rankings, why they are there, and the fundamental verdict in the system I just explained. So, In addition to announcing my intent, I’ll add an addendum here to each of my reviews that can be found above. Let’s start with Django.

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Django Unchained (2012) is a fairly notable film. It’s fantastically crafted by Tarantino into a sensationalist tale of exploitation, whilst being a very exhilarating, culturally relevant experience. The screenplay and script are excellent, and they are only elevated by the fantastic cast and performances within Django, particularly that of Jamie Foxx, Leonardo DiCaprio, and Cristoph Waltz.  The score is also pretty fantastic, a mass of homage to the original Django (1966) along with elements of modern music. Particularly that of black music culture, such as recording artists James Brown, and 2Pac Shakur which fleshes out the exploitation motif. Django Unchained is an original, action-packed, cultural and nostalgic experience all in one and truly deserves it’s spot. I’d say 51 is a fair number.

Judgment – Deserving.

Raging Bull (1980) is a brutal, and immersive look into the past of real-life boxer Jake LaMotta from RagingBull (1)the ever-talented Martin Scorsese. For me it really defined the biographical picture, and is one of the only films to really capture the true grit and tragedy involved in Boxing. Featuring unforgettable performances from Robert Deniro, and the debuting Joe Pesci, the film boasts some timeless star power even now. The direction is raw, intense, and truly powerful as we follow Jake to his unobtainable highs as middleweight champ, to debilitating lows as a lonely, bloated bum. For me there’s no real question if Raging Bull is deserving of it’s place among the Top 250. It’s number 100, is probably a bit low. For me, Raging Bull will always be among my top 10 and I’m honestly quite surprised to not see it further up.

Judgment – Deserving

Sixth Sense (1999) is a twist-based supernatural thriller from generally mixed director M.Night Shyamalan. The film toys with ideas of voyeurism as a little boy is haunted by visions of ghosts. A shamed and now distant psychologist tries to cure and guide the boy through his journey of discovery. The problem is, the film is entirely dull once you know about it’s twist and has little replay value in my opinion. In addition it’s twist is generally known, and is a running joke in popular culture. For me I felt the pacing was quite bland, and I didn’t really connect with the films storyline, and the major twist (as many Shyamalan films have) was spoiled for me years ago. I don’t feel Sixth Sense is a notable film, or that great in any sense though not by a lack of trying from Bruce Willis.

Judgment – Undeserved. 

vlcsnap-2013-06-22-15h58m31s239Casino (1995) is a gritty gambling epic also from the mind of Martin Scorsese. Similarly it also stars Joe Pesci and Robert Deniro. Like Raging Bull it has elements of the biographical, but focuses more highly on the drama of gang corruption and elements of a seedy nature within the world of casinos and high life in Vegas. Casino doesn’t pack the brutal punch of Raging Bull, but instead it has a highly stylized and textured feel to it’s very suiting aesthetics and surroundings. It’s a masterclass of building the epic, with it’s use of long winding, yet still intriguing plot-lines and ensemble cast with crucial supporting characters. Casino and it’s gripping tale of dice, drugs, and power easily earns it’s spot among IMDb’s Top 250.

Judgment – Deserved  

Annie Hall (1977) is a satirical romantic comedy from witty auteur Woody Allen. The film feels like a last hurrah in some ways, given his filmography and the very artistic direction he took following the success of Annie Hall. The film follows a comedian who recalls one of the greatest loves of his life, and how he fears he may never be able to forget her. Woody Allen stars as his comedic persona once again, alongside long time collaborator Diane Keaton. The story is told in a very vivid, and complex way as to make it feel a lot more fluid and snappy as opposed to melodramatic. I’m not so certain about Annie Hall’s conclusion in the Top 250. I can see it’s appeal, and how it it’s kind of the pinnacle of the rom-com.  However I feel mostly opposed to it, just because some of Allen’s other work has so much more soul. I suppose that’s just personal bias.

Judgment – Debatable

The Graduate (1966) is a coming of age (kind of?) drama from Mike Nichols. It features Ben, a fairly lost graduate who comes home from college and questions the path he should take next. He is seduced by Mrs.Robinson, whilst also taking a liking to her daughter Elaine. It questions why we live, and why we make the decisions we do. The story sounds relatively unspectacular, but the finished product is incredibly entertaining. It’s a much more unforgiving and remorseful look at life than most Hollywood pictures. It’s also the mainstream debut of Dustin Hoffman. A particular element I found notable in the Graduate, was it’s use of sound. Simon and Garfunkle’s ‘The Sound of Silence’ haunts the films meaning, and lingers around the film’s bittersweet tones. The Graduate is perhaps not the most original film, but it’s certainly finely honed.

Judgment – Deserved

Life of Pi (2012) is a fantasy drama from visual master Ang Lee. In my eyes it’s one of the most aesthetically beautiful films there probably ever will be, and certainly has been so far. It’s story details a man known as Pi Patel, who tells a story of his untraditional childhood to a writer who’s lacking in inspiration. Pi’s father owned a zoo, and he sought to move from India, and to do so he would have to cross the sea with his animals. The story unfolds as a freak tidal storm would strand Pi, making his future uncertain. It’s a stunning visual spectacle, supported by a story, about storytelling. The visuals mesh together so well with the inner workings of the story, and ultimately calls back upon the imagination and storytelling that led to cinema’s birth in the first place.

Judgment – Deserved

So that’s my first 7 I guess. It feels marginally Lazy, but my analysis of the film’s would be the same, and this addendum gives some context, and gets the ball rolling at least. The next will be regular sized reviews. I think I’ll probably start with Terry Gilliam’s 12 Monkeys. But i’m not certain. Anyway. I’d like to thank Tyson for writing a few words again, and hope many of you’ll join me as I trudge through this ambitious project. Thanks for stopping by, and follow my exploits at Sams_Reel_Views. 

Tales of the Squared Circle, and Tragic Elements in Boxing, Raging Bull (1980)

RagingBullThe Bull is a creature often associated with virility, aggression, and power. It rages out of instinct and fear, to no real goal or end because pure aggression is not something easily channeled. Martin Scorsese’s boxing drama Raging Bull (1980) captures the life of boxer Jake Lamotta adapted from his memoirs of the same name. The title refers to Jake Lamotta’s eponymous ring name ‘The Raging Bull’ known for his unrelenting and savage style of boxing. Boxing really is a tragic sport, particularly when it’s adapted to the frame of dramatic cinema. We see athletes risen as gods in their brief time in the limelight, but rarely is there a soothing catharsis. Is it a fair price to pay to leave your stamp on sporting history? your body? life-span? sometimes your family? Raging Bull is without a doubt the best cinematic depiction of Boxing, purely because it captures the rage and aggression in the ring, and most importantly the incredible pride before a sensational fall from grace.

The story focuses on Jake’ Lamotte’s (Robert Deniro) career as a boxer and his rise up the local talent along side his brother Joey Lamotte (Joe Pesci) who takes care of managerial duties. Unlike some boxing dramas, we see an immediate focus on drama. It depicts as a boxer, and how his style reflects his aggressive and unsettled mood outside of the ring.  He and his first wife constantly shout at and berate each other in constant domestic strife as Jake trades his wife in for a newer model, Vickie Thailer (Cathy Moriarty) a young 15 year old girl who he spots at the local pool, who he soon weds. He has a series of 5 matches against Sugar Ray Robinson, of which he won one, and lost 2 to controversial and very split-decisions most of which were booed avidly by the crowd.

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His wife Vickie and her old mob connections become utilized as they offer to give Jake the title fight he’s been wanting if he’s willing to throw a fight first. He throws the fight, which ends up incredibly obvious as Jake simply doesn’t fight back because of his pride. The fight is a farce and the New York Athletic commission suspend Jake. A year later, he receives his title shot and wins by unanimous decision. His marriage begins to slowly deteriorate as a result of domestic abuse. After his title win, Jake defends it a few times before beginning to struggle to maintain his fitness. His old rival Sugar Ray Robinson challenges him for the middleweight title, and Robinson wins in a match often referred to boxing’s own version of the Saint Valentine’s day massacre. As he retires his wife and children leave him. Things only worsen for Jake as he regrets losing the ones closest to him now his time as a boxer is well and truly through.

LaMotta's career rival, boxing legend Sugar Ray Robinson.

LaMotta’s career rival, boxing legend Sugar Ray Robinson.

Martin Scorcese’s seedy and sensationalist style, along with screenwriter Paul Schrader’s focus on the dramatic side of Lamotta’s life over the technical is what makes Raging Bull truly gripping and ultimately tragic. In the genre boxing films typically don’t show the latter half of a boxer’s career. They usually build up to a high point, a goal, a title shot or the end of a feud and then call it a day, they often avoid the decline. But Raging Bull is completely different, it entirely dispels the happy endings associated with Rocky-type boxing films. Imagine if Rocky faced Ivan Drago only to taste bitter defeat. The fall of the mighty Raging Bull is the tragic spectacle, the train wreck that we cant help but watch intently. You can learn a lot by contrasting Jake to his long-time rival Sugar Ray Robinson. Robinson was seen as a stellar athlete, a go-getter and an inspiration to all. Often smartly dressed, an entrepreneur Robinson was known for his style and slickness. Alternatively Lamotta was known as a ‘rough and rude’ type, a woman-beater full of rage. He opted to take hits instead of dodge them, often known as one of boxing’s toughest chins. In some ways we follow the villain in Raging Bull, and find it hard to have much sympathy for him in his lonelier years as Robinson’s continues to have a fantastic career winning the middleweight title an additional 4 times. However, one legacy lingers with Lamotta. Robinson never knocked him down, in fact nobody did. And nobody ever would in the ring. 

It’s use of black and white as opposed to colour is often disputed in it’s meaning. Most would assume it’s related to the time setting with most of the film taking part from 194o’s and onwards. However in it’s stance, it’s morality, it’s meaning Raging Bull is a very ‘grey’ film. Lamotta left his wife only to abuse a more younger innocent girl. He was imprisoned for escorting minors into the clutches of older men, and he assaulted his brother Joey one of the only true friends he had. Are we supposed to praise him as an athlete? respect his manly fortitude? have sympathy for the guy who’s lost it all and didn’t realize? Or are we supposed to be disgusted. Who knows. Not to mention he only got the title shot due to mob dealings, due to the intense corruption in the sport plaguing boxing in the 40’s-50’s. Would he have ever held the title round his waist if he didn’t have that connection? Regardless of whether Lamotte was a good guy or bad, he left his mark on the sport and a legacy in the ring. I suppose that’s what we celebrate in addition to his cathartic downfall. 

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Raging Bull was nominated for 7 oscars, and received 2, including the highly relevant Best Actor for Robert Deniro. Raging Bull initially had mixed acclaim because of it’s different and incredibly negative nature and many critics reacted badly to the sheer amount of violence. However, since it’s been widely accepted as one of the best American films ever made and often features frequent on top 100 and top 50 lists. People often look back on the 53rd academy awards and remark how the wrong film got the best picture award for that year, the incredibly formulaic Ordinary People (1980). In general people said that Raging Bull and David Lynch’s The Elephant Man two highly acclaimed films for that year didn’t received nearly enough praise. Raging Bull is a highly intense, brooding drama that depicts to true grit and nature of the sport of Boxing, and could be said to be Martin Scorcese’s best picture. If you haven’t seen it, you’re missing out. Also I’d highly recommend watching the match i’ve linked and comparing it to Scorcese’s depiction of the finish, a true treat for any sport fan. That’s all for this time. You stay classy WordPress. And follow me @Sams_Reel_Views. 

IMDB Top 250 Addendum:

Raging Bull (1980) is a brutal, and immersive look into the past of real-life boxer Jake LaMotta from the ever-talented Martin Scorsese. For me it really defined the biographical picture, and is one of the only films to really capture the true grit and tragedy involved in Boxing. Featuring unforgettable performances from Robert Deniro, and the debuting Joe Pesci, the film boasts some timeless star power even now. The direction is raw, intense, and truly powerful as we follow Jake to his unobtainable highs as middleweight champ, to debilitating lows as a lonely, bloated bum. For me there’s no real question if Raging Bull is deserving of it’s place among the Top 250. It’s number 100, is probably a bit low. For me, Raging Bull will always be among my top 10 and I’m honestly quite surprised to not see it further up.

Judgment – Deserved

Race and Culture in Django Unchained (2012)

DjangoUnchained

The plight and burden of the black man is one not covered well in the western genre, regardless of it’s deep historical roots. Or, on a more larger scale race is not a huge concern of the genre’s topics and tropes other than the occasional revisionist western about native Americans in a very subversive manner. Obviously there are exemptions to this, like Mandingo (1975), and Django (1966) (evidently quite potent inspirations for Django Unchained (2012).  I think some of the backlash regarding Django Unchained (2012) is simply because it wasn’t a harrowing sad tale of exploitation, it was an exhilarating celebration of freedom. It’s because Tarantino used the terrible exploitation of the past, and rehashed them into an entertaining popular culture film which some people don’t respect on that level of ideology and symbolism purely because it’s so sleek, and stylized.  Maybe it doesn’t have the elegance and sympathetic tones of Roots, or as much mourning because Django Unchained is about Django’s (Jamie Foxx) empowerment and his fight to become and be respected as equal.

django-unchained-man-with-iron-fists

The score of Django is a very pop-culture mash of many genres, time periods and so forth. However when you apply thoughts of race and culture in analysis of the film’s theatrical score and soundtrack it certainly has more gumption in it’s overall role. It has a lot of country and western music as you’d expect, the music of the deep south, the setting of the film. But in addition it has Rap, in addition to soul featuring a rather potent appearance of the track ‘Unchained’ a remix of James Brown and 2Pac.

The appearance of two of the biggest names in Soul and Rap, often referred to as the very zenith of black musical culture is not a sheer coincidence. The soundtrack represents the ideological clash, the culture of the uncultured redneck and the oppressive white man, juxtaposed with black contemporary culture which is quite an empowerment in Django’s minor elements.

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The villainous white man, Mr.Calvin Candy

Now, it’s not exactly hard to say the man who enjoys making black people fight to death for his amusement, is racist.  But some of the more subtle elements of scenes containing Calvin (Leonardo DiCaprio) depict him as corrupt, not just his actions. While he may play the dapper gentleman in his suits surrounded by high luxury and decorum nothing can hide his buck yellow teeth, a traditional mis-en-scene sign that someone is of amoral values. Not to mention the literal sense in his name relating to this, candy, sweets, decay etc. He’s also quite intolerant as he likes to be addressed by Monsieur Candie,  yet Mr.Mogli deters King Schultz from speaking French to Candie, as it will anger him and make him feel stupid. The dessert they have after the entree? ‘white cake’. Symbolism doesn’t get much more evident than that. In addition it was Stephen who saw the ruse of King’s plan, as Calvin had completely believed them. Calvin maybe put on a show, but ultimately he’s nothing without the power of slavery.

Somewhat a more focused, and theological review today thought i’d be in depth instead of just reviewing Django as most of us have seen it by now (Except for Spike Lee). Anyway, thanks for stopping by, and please Like/Follow/Comment and follow me on Twitter @Sams_Reel_Views. Thanks. 

IMBD Top 250 Addendum:

Django Unchained (2012) is a fairly notable film. It’s fantastically crafted by Tarantino into a sensationalist tale of exploitation, whilst being a very exhilarating, culturally relevant experience. The screenplay and script are excellent, and they are only elevated by the fantastic cast and performances within Django, particularly that of Jamie Foxx, Leonardo DiCaprio, and Cristoph Waltz.  The score is also pretty fantastic, a mass of homage to the original Django (1966) along with elements of modern music. Particularly that of black music culture, such as recording artists James Brown, and 2Pac Shakur which fleshes out the exploitation motif. Django Unchained is an original, action-packed, cultural and nostalgic experience all in one and truly deserves it’s spot. I’d say 51 is a fair number.

Judgment – Deserving.